The Fastest 40 Yard Dash Ever

What Research Found Out On This Very Important Topic
By: Chad Wilson   @Gridironstuds

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Football fans across America continue to obsess over the most simple drill in the game of football. Is there anything more discussed than the 40 yard dash? Every Spring, this drill takes center stage and undoubtedly the question is asked 1,o00’s of times. What’s the fastest 40 yard dash?

Just as sure as you get the question asked 1,000 times, you will get dozens of ridiculous answers. For starters, let’s find out why the 40 yard dash? When and why did 40 yards become so significant? It started in the 1960’s with the NFL team that had the most developed and comprehensive scouting department and that was the Dallas Cowboys. Prior to this time period, NFL coaches chose the 50 yard dash as the mark of measure to determine a player speed worthiness. In 1960, Gil Brandt, the director scouting for the Cowboys along with his department came up with the 40/20/10 measurement. The 40 was used for all players. The 20 yard split time of the 40 was of great significance for linemen since the thought was that they rarely run 40 yards in a game. The 10 yard split was important for wide receivers as a measure of their burst off of the line of scrimmage. With this, a drill was born and almost 50 years later, it has become the center piece of info on a prospective high school, college or professional football player.

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Prime Time Made it Ok to Play Cornerback

“Chad I think you should play cornerback.”  Those words from a childhood friend of mine in 1986 brought fire to my belly.  “Man I’m a running back,” I fired back.  I was going to be the next Eric Dickerson.  I had my neck roll,  my upright running style and if they wouldn’t have given me a headache,  I would have worn the Rec Specs goggles too.

I couldn’t really name any cornerbacks back them.  I knew Leroy Irvin because he played for my favorite team,  the Los Angeles Rams.  Of course everyone knew Lester Hayes because he was one part good, one part half crazy.  Other than that,  there was no one inspiring me to stand real close to the sidelines and chase a receiver around the field for an entire game.  Runningbacks got the ball,  were able to make sweet moves and they scored touchdowns.  They get their face on TV.    Cornerbacks,  in 1986, weren’t doing that.

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